England Premier League predictions and odds

The Premier League needs no introduction. This is one of the biggest and most important national leagues on the planet, after all. Brits are some of the most passionate punters around, too. Throw in the global appeal of England’s top football, and this is likely the most important competition in the world of football betting.

To that end, we’re prepared to greet the 2020/21 season with the latest Premier League betting predictions and tips. No matter how good our tips are, though, the true joy of betting is being able to make your wagers. On this page, we’ll outline the ins and outs of the English Premier League and how to bet on Premier League matches in 2022/23.

Upcoming Matches

03/10/2022
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  • match
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England Premier League Predictions

01/10/2022

Arsenal - Tottenham Hotspur

Betting tip (stake: 8/10): Over 2,5 1.77 at Betsson
Correct score prediction: 3:2
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01/10/2022

AFC Bournemouth - Brentford

Betting tip (stake: 9/10): Over 2,5 2.1 at Betsson
Correct score prediction: 3:2
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01/10/2022

Crystal Palace - Chelsea

Betting tip (stake: 3/10): HT/FT Draw/Away 1 at 10Bet
Correct score prediction: 1:3
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01/10/2022

Fulham - Newcastle United

Betting tip (stake: 9/10): Over 2,5 1.97 at Betsson
Correct score prediction: 2:1
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01/10/2022

Liverpool - Brighton & Hove Albion

Betting tip (stake: 8/10): Under 3,5 1 at 10Bet
Correct score prediction: 2:0
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01/10/2022

Southampton - Everton

Betting tip (stake: 7/10): Under 2,5 1.89 at Betway
Correct score prediction: 0:0
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01/10/2022

West Ham United - Wolverhampton Wanderers

Betting tip (stake: 9/10): Under 2,5 1.81 at Betsson
Correct score prediction: 1:1
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Premier League Standings

  • Team
  • MP
  • W
  • D
  • L
  • F
  • A
  • D
  • P
  • Last Five
  • 1
  • Arsenal
  • 7
  • 6
  • 0
  • 1
  • 17
  • 7
  • 10
  • 18
  • W W W L W
  • 6
  • Fulham
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 12
  • 11
  • 1
  • 11
  • W L W L W
  • 7
  • Chelsea
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1
  • 2
  • 8
  • 9
  • -1
  • 10
  • D L W L W
  • 13
  • Everton
  • 7
  • 1
  • 4
  • 2
  • 5
  • 6
  • -1
  • 7
  • D D D D W
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England Premier League Results

Round 7

England Premier League Results

  • Date
  • match
  • HT
  • FT
  • 1
  • x
  • 2
  • 12/09/2022
  • Leeds United - Nottingham Forest
  • (:)
  • :
  • 11/09/2022
  • Arsenal - Everton
  • (:)
  • :
  • 11/09/2022
  • West Ham United - Newcastle United
  • (:)
  • :
  • 11/09/2022
  • Crystal Palace - Manchester United
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • Fulham - Chelsea
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • AFC Bournemouth - Brighton & Hove Albion
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • Leicester City - Aston Villa
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • Liverpool - Wolverhampton Wanderers
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • Southampton - Brentford
  • (:)
  • :
  • 10/09/2022
  • Manchester City - Tottenham Hotspur
  • (:)
  • :
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Premier League History and General Info

The best place to start understanding a certain league is its history and format. Many of you may already be familiar with these basics, so feel free to skip ahead. However, it contains some important information for newcomers, such as how the table works and which teams are the most successful in the league’s history.

In terms of its origins, no league can claim the same prestige as the Premier League. Though the competition as we know it today was established in 1990, its roots stretch back to 1888. Football in England is a bit older than that, of course, but this was when the English Football League was first created. By allowing professionalism in their clubs, the English created the first association football league in the world. This would go on to change the game forever, and most association leagues on the planet are at least vaguely modelled on the English one.

Until that point, competitions were strictly amateur and clubs were prohibited from paying their players. Furthermore, fixtures would often be organized between the teams themselves. William McGregor, the director of Aston Villa at the time, finally managed to organize it all into something resembling today’s professional leagues.

The entire league initially had just 12 clubs. As time progressed, though, more teams joined and multiple divisions were created. The English Football League continued existing for decades after that, and the country was never far from the pinnacle of the world’s football.

That brings us to the ‘80s. Despite several successes in the international theatre, the late ‘80s will be remembered as an all-time low for English football. The game was still as popular as ever, but the teams weren’t seeing much of that. Stadiums were in disrepair, hooliganism was bigger than ever, and important players were moving out of the country to greener pastures. The game was becoming increasingly commercialised, and English teams couldn’t keep up with the demands of being a business venture.

The biggest clubs banded together to make a change. Teams such as Manchester United, Liverpool, Tottenham, Everton and Arsenal threatened to leave the English football league unless the television companies offered them better terms. This was more than successful for a time, but the clubs wanted more financial independence.

By 1991, the wheels for an FA-backed break-away from the English Football League were in motion. The idea was that if only top-flight clubs shared the profits (specifically the TV profits), the league would be more financially viable in the long term.

In 1992, all First Division clubs resigned from the pre-existing league and formed the Premier League. The competition’s format would remain the same, complete with promotion and relegation, but the top-flight would be a separate limited company. On a separate note, the English Football League Championship – which was the top-flight of English football until 1993 – became the second-tier league in the country.

The plan turned out rather fruitful, as you might be able to tell. The re-structuring paved the way for the Premier League to become the giant it is today – both in terms of financial strength and the size and importance of its member clubs. Throughout its history, the Premier League was

dominated by several clubs. Initially, these were Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool and Manchester United, but the list was later expanded to include Tottenham and Manchester City. Strangely enough, this makes the Premier League somewhat less predictable than a lot of the other top-tier European national leagues. Most of them are dominated by one or two clubs at a time – England has six!

Format

Unsurprisingly, the Premier League follows the standardized format – in fact, it’s likely responsible for popularising the template. To avoid confusion, though, we’ll go over it.

The Premier League consists of 20 clubs. A season typically lasts from August to May the following year, with each team playing each other team twice. This adds up to a total of 38 games – 19 home games and 19 away matches. A win nets a team 3 points, while a draw earns them 1. The teams are then ranked based on how many points they’ve earned. In the event of a tie, they’re ranked by goal difference and then goals scored. If two teams are still equal, they occupy the same position, and a play-off match is played if the title, qualification, or relegation slots are at stake.

The three bottom-placed teams are relegated to the EFL Championship. They are replaced by the two best-placed teams from the Championships and the winner of a series of play-offs involving the third, fourth, fifth and sixth-placed clubs.

Now, according to UEFA’s system of national league coefficients, the Premier League is the second-ranked national league in Europe. This means that the 4 top-placed teams in a season qualify for the Champions League group stage. The fifth-placed team goes on to the Europa League along with the winners of the FA Cup.


Premier League Derby Matches

The Premier League has accumulated an inordinate number of derbies over the years. To keep things short, we’ll list just a few of the ones that will be interesting in 2020/21.

North-West Derby

If you’ve been paying attention to our club overview, a showdown between Liverpool and Manchester United should already sound exciting. Even without the centuries-old rivalry between the two cities, this is still a clash between some of the most successful and beloved football clubs in the world.

Manchester Derby

Seeing how Manchester has produced 2 of the Top 3 clubs currently in the runnings, it should come as no surprise that this local derby is quite an affair. The rivalry dates back to 1881, making it one of the most notable local football rivalries ever to exist.

The North London Derby

There’s barely a national league out there which doesn’t include a local derby in the capital. Now, Arsenal and Tottenham are not expected to top the table this season, but that doesn’t mean this showdown is going to be any less appealing. This is one of the fiercest rivalries in Europe, and it never fails to produce exciting matchups.

Premier League Best Stadiums

Old Trafford

Man United’s home turf is the largest stadium in the Premier League by a considerable margin. It can welcome no less than 75,000 spectators, second only to Wembley in the UK (which can house over 90,000 but isn’t used in the Premier League.) Old Trafford is as famous as a stadium can be, still occupying the same grounds it did over a century ago.

Anfield

Speaking of famous stadiums – a football pitch doesn’t get much more storied than Anfield. Liverpool’s home grounds have been around since 1884, undergoing several expansions and improvements. It’s not particularly big or pretty by Premier League standards, but it has housed more legendary showdowns than one could count.

The Emirates Stadium

Also known as the Ashburton Grove or simply Arsenal Stadium, this one is on the opposite side of the spectrum. It’s new and spectacular – which is the same thing that can be said of their biggest rivals’ stadium – and has the best and most modern facilities in the Premier League with a capacity of just over 60,000.